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Effective integration of the national economy

The efficiency of integrating small countries into the world market depends largely on a country’s strategic choice of specialisation. However, burdened with numerous limitations, small countries are not so free to select the branches and industrial sectors they will specialise in to cater for the needs of the global market
Dr. Aleksandar Gračanac, author of the book
Datum: 31/01/2018

Effective integration of the national economy

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The modern world is comprised of an increasingly dense network of power relations that simultaneously shape and constrain both the individual and the state. The consequence is that economies are less and less national and increasingly global. Autonomous policies are becoming less effective, faced with global flows of capital, people, technology, knowledge, financial transactions and the global financial crisis.

Market economy is showing weaknesses and demonstrating that it is not the only optimizer automatically ensuring the survival of the fittest, because rigidity and delays, informal relationships, information barriers and transaction costs dominate the operating environment today.

The changes are far-reaching. A state's monetary and fiscal policies are no longer based on the national financial system, rather on transnational financial structures, which inevitably must undergo a sort of restructuring (global financial crisis).

The 1990s brought far-reaching changes in the socio-economic environment in terms of the strategy, structure and management of operations. Businesses (transnational corporations, TNCs) were integrated into the world economy through alliances that formed through partnerships and mergers, in order to achieve profitable goals and develop solutions that improve processes, productivity and profitability. In the future world, estimates suggest between the second and third decades of the 21st century, we are expected to have several global strategic alliances: Pacific (America and Asia), American (North, Central and South America), Atlantic (America and Europe) and European (Europe, Russia and North America), while in the distant future only one alliance will exist: the global network.

The world market is marked by four economic domains: the global money and investment economy, the economy of TNCs, regional economics and national economies. The existence of these economic areas imposes the need for an integration model on the world market.

The efficiency of integrating small countries into the world market depends largely on a country's strategic choice of specialisation. However, burdened with numerous limitations, small countries are not so free to select the branches and industrial sectors they will specialise in to cater for the needs of the global market.

 

The strategy of identifying niche products on the market is ideal for small countries that inevitably must specialise in one type of production and exports for which there is great interest in larger countries. Small countries must seek gaps in the market that big companies from major countries cannot fill because they are disinterested and inflexible. In projecting increases in exports, small countries' national economies opt for that product nomenclature that envisages lasting resources, conditions for competition (price, quality, delivery deadlines, branding, promotion etc.) and stimulating production in areas that increase profitability by reducing the cost of dependence and substituent import inputs.

 

* The strategy of international cooperation enables small countries to engage in a number of cooperative technological development projects through direct corporate joint agreements. As the world product market is dominated by high export structures, the trend of including small countries will be of crucial importance in the future formation of competitive advantages.

 

The strategy of creating a systemic environment for efficient operations and forming an increasing a number of SMEs and family businesses and their specialisation in certain types of products, binding them to large domestic and foreign companies. This strategy has seen many countries build a recognisable image as super export leaders, like Germany. At the beginning of 2000, within its strategy to integrate the European economy into the globalization process, the economy of the EU prioritised preparations for increasing the economic activity of SMEs to the highest level. And with the adoption of the Small Business Act, SBA, of 2008, all states accepted the imperative of this act as a key component of development, especially during the period of the global financial crisis.

 

The strategy of creating large companies and their efficiency increases national competitiveness, which has been shown by the examples of companies from Switzerland, Norway, Belgium, Austria etc.

 

* The strategy of product specialisation is a kind of synthesis between the cooperation strategy and the strategy of identifying niche products on the market.

 

* Economic Sciences Ph.D. Aleksandar Gračanac gained his professional, technical management and scientific experience in industry , institutions and chambers of commerce in Belgium, Germany and institutions of the EU. He is visiting professor at universities throughout Europe. He is the author of six books and more than 70 research papers published in national and international journals. He is a former athlete and rugby player for Partizan Belgrade RUFC, with whom he won five national championships and two national cups, and a journalism correspondent for the publication Sportski žurnal (Sporting Journal). He is currently serving as coordinator of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce's Committee for Small & Medium-sized Enterprises,Entrepreneurship and He speaks English and German fluently and has good knowledge of French.

 


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